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that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put information into her fault about her health care. if you have heard daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that use
using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the sc
through these difficult times. when the company urged -- merge with u.s. airways in 2005, parker took a new set of challenges on as the ceo of the newly restructured legacy alive. u.s. airways is a company built on mergers and acquisitions, which is a fitting for dug parker, the industry's main advocate for consolidation. he has argued time and again the airlines can be more flexible, more capable, and more valuable to travelers if they join forces . the airlines that did so are now operating successfully. mr. parker believes the combining u.s. airways and american airlines would create a more competitive industry and a more sustainable airline. so far his plan has received widespread support, including and, perhaps, surprisingly from the workers and american airlines and the union. he is here today to tell us more about the merger and where it sits and to his broader vision for the industry as a whole. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming dug parker to the national press club. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, all of you, it was very nice. i will say to my not a good p
's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you ver
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
.n. security council after russia and china, again, exercised their veto power. the u.s. ambassador t tthe united nations says russia and china are protecting the syrian president and that thousands of civilians uld die as a result. susan rice spoke after the russian and chinese representatives at u.n. security council vetoed the latest resolution on the conflict in syria. the draft would have permitted nonmilitary sanctions if president assad's government refused to stop using heavy artillery within ten days and the resolution called for a 45-day extension of the u.n. cease-fire observers mission. the current term expires on friday. it's a third time russia and china have vetoed u.n. resolutions on syria. >> the security council has failed utterly. this is another dark day in turtle bay. one can only hope that one day, before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow -- >> western nations are expected to try to dlaft another resolution to extend the mission of the u.n. cease-fire observers. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon regrets the securi
we used to say faculty took 80% to. and 200 years ago it makes them in the effective. it is to start on the aspect of the college and university the way academic programs are delivered. you will say a much greater savings. . . for thi hearing. see no objection, mr. duncan, yet no objection to that? i now recognize myself for an opening statement. unmanned aerial systems commonly known as drone has been a game changer for men and women serving in iraq and afghanistan. the systems have provided troops with eyes in the skies have taken the flight to the enemy. to eliminate the most dangerous al qaeda terrorist, drums have increased capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and
introduce her, first, thank you for both commissioners for bearing with us. this was my responsibility for getting * mixed up. i appreciate your forbearance -- for bearing with us on that ledge. yes i have the your coming with us -- coming together with us for the special item. this is a project it that we have been working on for a while, and has offered a partnership with us on this design challenge, to come merida with innovative ways to deal with the -- come up with innovative ideas for the design problem related to the additions and the new construction in the historic districts, south of the market district and how these may be approached. we will have some interesting possibilities and approaches to this challenge. i will introduce driscoll, who will talk to you about the program. and how the design program is organized. thank you. >> i am the executive director with the center for architecture and design. i am happy that this is something that is fine, because this will be different than a lot of the presentations that you will see. we do a variety of programs for the community
that we also can boast twice as many asian-americans on federal benches. those of us to understand the impact of the supreme court and what it can do or on june, we know that having asian-americans on the federal bench is a line up for appointments to the supreme court. thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to say that silicon valley is the birthplace of high-tech. silicon valley is the birthplace of norm. five minutes? thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, congressmen. we would have extended the five minutes if we got a karaoke's song. >> this event would have not been possible by the financial contributions of our sponsors. we want to thank chevron corp., wells fargo, mcdonald's, academy of arts university, at&t, southwest airlines. if you have not entered their raffled yet, do so later tonight. comcast, walmart, verizon, moon star restaurant. >> we go from the greatest karaoke's singer in the house of congress to the self-proclaimed worst karaoke singing in public office. i would like to introduce california state controller, serving his second term. he takes
think the u.s. economy possibly by the fourth quarter will be in a recession, and recession usually comes with bear markets. we have central banks around the world doing everything they can to keep us out of further weakness. the only reason that the s&p's are because of the prospect -- >> so which it really that spike in yields, the spanish debt, and the italian debt that unnerved the markets? what's behind this? it feels like it's a real headline risk driven market. >> yes, it reinforces the difficulty europe is having. it's on the heels of what the market thought would cure this. it's sovereign from the bailout to the individual banks and people realizing it's not as clear as that. that recession is likely intensifying. it's slowing down, and i think the u.s. economy is heading to a recession and there is negative implications for earnings. >> let's talk about earnings, because as peter says, we're going toward a recession here. we have chipotle today with bad guidance and revenue growth slowing there. should investors be more concerned than they seem to be? >> i think they shoul
at the use of domestic drums. republican senator tom coburn on the anti-tax pledge signed by many gop members of congress. >> it was about those men and women who are almost mortally injured and more. who because of the huge advances that have been made and medical trauma treatment over the last 10 years, now they are being saved. an incredible number of being saved. almost everybody who follows on the battlefield is being saved. i wanted to write about what life was like for these people. i started out with the question having seen some people who were pretty, pretty gruesomely maimed , wouldn't it be better off if they were dead? .we wish that they were dead? >> the senate education committee heard from college presidents today about ways to control tuition costs. educators are michigan, iowa, indiana and florida testified from us two hours. >> senate committee on health education committee and labour pensions will come to order. as we approach the start of the academic year, many students and families are struggling to pay the estimated cost of college. during the difficult economic times,
. fill us in. >> reporter: what we know now is what we've been reporting. 14 people are dead. we're told ten of them were killed in the movie theater and four additional people were injured but taken to local hospitals and have since passed away. 50 people have been injured and are still alive. we're told that some are in serious condition, some are also in fair condition. the scene is definitely still unfolding here, so we don't have all of the information, but the numbers that we are -- just by the minute, this is really what we're learning, so we're trying to stay on top of this, but you can tell this is a very serious situation with 14 people daend some 50 injured. >> tell us what kind of crowd may have been assembled at the movie theater, at the century 16. obviously, this was a big night for this movie, midnight showings across the country. packed house, safe to say? >> reporter: absolutely. the people who were in theater number 9 who are talking with us -- and theater number 9 is where we believe that at least the shooting occurred. we're not sure if it started there, ended there
available as the day progresses. but we wanted to make sure those of you who are starting your day with us knew about it. let's move to our question of the morning, which is about jobs creation. the number of proposals on both sides of still and the parties disagree about what the -- still and the parties disagree with what it is. let me show you a little bit of some of the stories in the newspaper this morning about on this economy p. this is "the washington post" this morning -- host: here's more from "the washington post" -- "new york times" this morning. economy remains soft and output and housing. data on home sales and factory production weakening u.s. commitment americans bought fewer homes in june than in may. manufacturing in the philadelphia region contracted for a third number of months and the number of americans seeking unemployment rose last week. we like to ask you, what's the most effective way to create jobs in this country? let's begin with a phone call from debbie, a democrat in philadelphia. good morning, debbie. caller: good morning. i notice yesterday with the outsour
than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap? ♪ i need some help. my brain elasticity is not too god. i -- go
of a movie next to us. so nobody thought anything of it. 30 seconds later, they evacuated us. we were hearing from friends that were actually inside -- i'm pretty sure they were in theater nine, one of the main theaters, that he was wearing a gas mask and throwing tear gas at people. he wasn't trying to let anybody out. >> really? >> yes. >> did you see anybody who was hurt? >> yeah. we saw people -- we saw a couple people hunched over leaving the theater and ambulances were filled, but they weren't going anywhere. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start." we have breaking news to report wri right now. a shooting at a theater overnight at the showing of "the dark knight rises" that happened in aurora, colorado. a suburb of denver. dozens of police and firefighters are on the scene right now. our affiliate is following the story, everyone following the story now. we have reports of multiple deaths. we are working to confirm that. we know it was a multiple shooting of "the dark knight rises." aurora, colorado is about nine miles east of denver. local hospitals reporting patients are
donated to it could use it, host it, share it. >> for quite a great deal of team she was hired in 2005, she struggled with finding the correct and appropriate visual expression. >> it was a bench at one point. it was a darkened room at another point. but the theme always was a theme of how do we call people's attention to the issue of speci species extinction. >> many exhibits do make long detailed explanations about species decline and biology of birds and that is very useful for lots of purposes. but i think it is also important to try to pull at the strings inside people. >> missing is not just about specific extinct or endangered species. it is about absence and a more fundamental level of not knowing what we are losing and we need to link species loss to habitat loss and really focuses much on the habitat. >> of course the overall mission of the academy has to do with two really fundamental and important questions. one of which is the nature of life. how did we get here? the second is the challenge of sustainability. if we are here how are we going to find a way to stay? these que
for being with us. greta is next to go on the record. and we'll see you tomorrow night. >> greta: tonight, it is absolutely unbelievable. turns out that guy in the bath tub was just the tip of the iceberg. the gsa caught again. you thought it was bad when they wasted tax money on clowns, mind readers and red wine with a warm bath. at least that was for a four day conference in vegas. now, we find out they blew $270,000 in one day on something else. we guarantee you will not be happy with this one. first, has the atf scandal now gotten bigger? watch this video message to atf worker from their boss, the acting director. what is the message behind it? >> if you make moor choices then if you don't abide by the rules that if you don't respect the chain of command if you don't find the appropriate way to raise your concerns to your leadership there will be consequences because we cannot tolerate, we cannot tolerate an undisciplined organization. >> greta: lawmakers are calling the video message ominous and scary. really meant to chill whistle blowers? darycongressman issa firing ofa letter to f
, the u.s. security council approved a 30-day extension for its monitoring mission in a syrian. they are part of kofi annan's peace plan to end the 16-month conflict. >> there is no sign of any peace in syria. thousands are fleeing the country. fighting between military and rebels intensifies. >> diplomatic pressure has failed to break the impasse at the u.n. security council. for now, that means no sanctions against the assad regime. but u.n. observers will be allowed to stay on in syria. russia remains adamantly opposed to any resolution that would impose an embargo on damascus. moscow is coming under increasing criticism for its hard-line stance. the foreign ministry rejects the resolution as one-sided. >> certain western countries are blaming russia in part for the escalation of violence in syria but this is absolutely unacceptable. instead of making rude insinuations about russian foreign policy, our western partners should be convincing the syrian opposition groups to find a political solution. >> but there's no evidence of that happening anytime soon. street fighting con
with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share in what are the technologies and what they
station in their hand. it was a very important step for us. i want to mention arc-tech's contribution. they can do a better job of mobile distribution. by the way, there are many people. i would like to recognize the whole team involved. the project director was leo solomon. he is here today, and he is going to work with the inspector who is responsible for training more than 1,300 officers on the system. [applause] >> thank you. what we are going to show you this morning is a couple of screen shots of the crime data warehouse system which will allow you to see exactly what the officer is going to see either on the street or at their computers they are working on now. so here what you have is the search field which, as you can see here, we can search for anything. description, nicknames, tattoos, partial license plates, hair color and et cetera. this search tab basically functions just like a google type search that you would do at your home computer. when you put in the key word, it searches the entire internet. this searches exactly the same thing, but only our police database which
it at 25, as long as you briefly to issues we discussed. will it be helpful for us to have other applications of a lot of facts? that is fine. you can do that within 25 pages. i want to talk about timing. the one thing i definitely want is an exchange of your respective findings of fact so that you have a column for your bottle position. i probably should have made another visual. it is like a summary judgment motion. i want to give you guys an opportunity to exchange those. when can you have those done and when can you exchange them so that we have them. when can get those so we have them by august 10th? the chorus to have the document august to attend. >> there is little which is more like an appellant argument. i then we should focus on the facts. kerber there will be opportunity for us to as pieces of the questions about the law off and we will have thought your briefing. i will have this played a little bit more heavily to the facts. >> we would deliver our arguments, then follow up question in. with this fifa on the facts of aloft? >> yes. if -- would this be on the facts o
to overseas companies. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. . >>> joining us i'm jessica doyle. jc hayward has the day off. >>> police in aerror remark colorado are identifying to -- in aurora, colorado are trying to navigate through jamie holmes' home. at least 12 people are dead and over 50 are injured in a shooting. among those hurt is a 3-month- old baby. police say 24-year-old holmes walked into the theater and started firing. here's what witnesses had to say about the horror inside that theater. >> he was just in a black gas mask and all black. besides that -- [ inaudible ] >> he took a gun and pointed it straight to my face. he was literally three feet away from me. he was wearing a gas mask and he looked like he was from a s.w.a.t. team or something. i was just terrifed. i didn't know what to do. i jumped forward into the aisle and curled into a ball and waited for him to go up the stairs. >> there was a break. stuck my head up. caught a glimpse of him, the main silhouette and he started shooting again. >> none of us knew what was going on. at that point there's a
the injured, two u.s. air force reservists and one navy service member. earlier today, president obama spoke about the tragedy. >> my daughters go to the movies. what if malia and sasha had been at the theater as so many of our kids do every day. michelle and i will be fortunate enough to hug our girls a little tighter tonight and i'm sure you will do the same with your children, but for those parents who may not be so lucky, we have to embrace them and let them know we will be there for them as a nation. so again, i'm so grateful that all of you are here. i am so moved by your support, but there are going to be other days for politics. this i think is a day for prayer and reflection. >> joining me today, "time" magazine deputy washington bureau chief, michael crowley and patricia murphy, contributor to the daily beast. certainly a day of reflection. we are all still processing a lot as it comes to the details of this tragedy. michael, i want to talk about the president's comments, saying this isn't a day for politics, calling for us to -- it's a reminder of the fragility of life and calling
sanctions on syria. we will talk about what is ahead for u.s. policy on "washington journal." we will have the census bureau director with the numbers and manufacturing, trade, personal income, and home ownership. also the formal federal elections commissioner talks about why he opposes requiring independent campaign groups to disclose where they get their money. "washington journal," is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 eastern. >> rahm emanuel and ray lahood speak about infrastructure hon refunding this morning at the center for american progress in washington. you concede that live on c-span at 10:15 a.m.. at 12:10 eastern, mitt romney campaigns in new hampshire. that is also live on c-span. more road to the white house covers live on c-span at 6:00 p.m. with first lady michelle obama delivering a campaign speech in fredericksburg, virginia. >> this weekend, familiar cities, the harlem book fair, live coverage starts saturday at 12:30 eastern on the future of african-american publishing followed with a look at education at 2:00 and then cornell west examine the next presidential elec
, and it did take people, witnesses tell us, a little while to realize something wasn't right. i did speak to one gentleman who says he was in the very bark row of theater number 9. he got down on the floor and he waited there as long as he could before everybody started leaving the theater very quickly, he says. this is one of those situations where because of the movie that was showing, many people didn't realize that it wasn't part of the movie and that it wasn't part of some type of special effect for people who were going to the actual movie. >> jace, what about the suspect? we just heard the police chief in aurora tell us they have someone in custody. what do the police know about him? >> reporter: we don't know anything about him at this point. we just know there's one person in custody. we're being told that all indications are that this person acted by himself. they're still, of course, looking to see if there's somebody else out there, but all indications are, according to the aurora police chief, that this is just one person acting alone. >> and jace, one of the first things tha
are concerned about. and especially when you have a u.s. attorney who helps cover it up and then an attorney general who ultimately won't turn over the facts related to it, of course, you are worried about it. if not for the whistle blowers senator grassley and our investigation would have never gotten started. whistle blowers were critical to us understanding and ultimately knowing what to ask for and in most cases the most meaningful information we never got in justice, we got from whistle blowers. >> greta: atf is denying this was an effort to tell whistle blowers they better shut up. the spokesperson said it addressed topics ranging from trust to mission and morale and this one dealt with choices and consequences but was not meant to discourage legally protected activities and was directed to employees who violate the rules and was not directed at those with protected disclosure. >> when i was a young man if my hand was in the cookie jar and my mom wanted to know i was taking a cookie, i didn't say what cookie jar. it was clear, use your chain of command or else. no question at all about
flooding. out to the west out into west virginia, eastern ohio, showers and storms and that will bring us a round of heavy showers and thunderstorms. we already have a flash flood watch issued for most of the area here west of the chesapeake bay starting at 12:00 noon today. look out for that potential later this afternoon and tonight. i think your morning hours are fine but by mid- to late afternoon, look out for the showers. some of those will be heavy. 87 your daytime high in washington. 89 in fredericksburg. >> we've been getting used to it with all the power outages if you come across any traffic signals that are dark, please be sure to use those as a four- way stop. we are following the situation here traveling the inner loop at 201. disabled vehicle here and some activity off to the right shoulder t look like everybody is moving past it at much better speed now. your delays should be easing out from college park heading into greenbelt. on the outer loop from college park heading into silver spring, you are in good shape. 66, new accident here. this is just prior to route 50 fair oa
throughout the afternoon. thanks for trusting fuss your -- trusting us for your world and information. "your world," with neil cavuto is next. >> someone is down. someone is down. >> seven down in theater nine. >> i have a child victim. i need rescue at the theater nine. now. >> bringing the bodies out. get someone here as soon as you can. >> chilling 9-1-1 tapes of the colorado movie master -- massacre. today, a search for answers. >> if you are regular viewer you know by now i often say the show is not about red or blue but green, your money. today it is about black. and death. needless. pointless. senseless. a movie master that wasn't a movie taking from folks who, like us, only wanted to see a movie. like many of you i have kids, too. like many of you my thoughts were and are racing too. i have read allowed, again, about where they are going, and yes, what movie they seeing. and like many of you there is a familiarity to all of this and it is just repeating. but it is the black hole of notening able to ever fully understand how this can happen that has me, like you, so unsettled. that is
, calling for us to -- it's a reminder of the fragility of life and calling for unity. what did you make of his comments? >> it's always a fine line because there are a lot of people who don't want to be hearing about politics, they don't want -- people want to be very careful about not exploiting a terrible tragedy like this. there is a pretty credible counterargument that says you don't turn it into a political fight where you're trying to get an advantage over your enemies and exploit it but i do think it's reasonable to have a national conversation about the context, about why these things happen, whether there are things we can do to prevent tragedies like this. if a plane crashes because you think the aircraft control system wasn't working, you would talk about how to reform it. but guns is such a volatile loaded subject, i think someone like obama and probably mitt romney are going to step back because they know that walking into that conversation immediately just turns into a distorted politicized -- >> mitt romney is expected to make remarks in the next few minutes. we'll bring
. >> all right. our next scene is going to move us from story telling that took place during the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye brows and
conviction. abc 7 news joins us live from city hall with more. carolyn? >> there is a long night for ilyana lopez. we caught up with her here just a short time ago. and she was smiling and talked to reporters saying she feels good and there is not much ground covered last night and the attorney says that she did a fantastic job. >> her wit come as cross. >> she's at the heart after the tempt to oust her husband, sheriff ross mirkarimi. the mayor made this move after mirkarimi pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor domestic violence charge. and there is lopez supporting him, defending the marriage. >> never consider divorcing her husband. ever? >> no. >> no. we haven't talken about that. we never make decisions. >> abc 7's legallan lift says lopez expressing a united front is typical in domestic violence cases. >> there is a problem is that is not what she said at the time. city attorneys will point that out. >> that video taken by her neighbor. on the stand lopez talked about her conversation with madison and tried to put the tape into context. >> and she said as sheriff... this is an old-, used t
aspects of japanese culture that you would want us to take away reading this book? we are fixated on figuring out who the samurai is we have ideas and we are trying to deconstruct the attributes of a samurai. in your opinion what would be useful for us to think about or focus on as we finish the book. we are a third of the way through it. >> one of those kind of questions [laughter]. i will tell you about an e mail i got this entire high school on the east coast is reading the samurai's garden. i started to get 30 e mails. they discovered through the website an e mail which would come directly tow me. i started to figure it out when all the questions were the same. they -- it was the questions which they had to write their essay on. one young woman wrote me and said, i don't know if i have time to read the book can you tell me who the samurai is and where the garredin is? [laughter]. i thought these kids are going to be okay. you know this is our generation coming up. i wrote her and said, you know, read the book. i think for me, because i think every book is a learning process f
is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah. >> (speaking spanish) (laughing) (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called c carete and with the right hand and the left hand and open and shuts in a rhythmic time. >> (speaking spanish). >> so this instrument is called sen sero but it's actually a cow bell. >> (moo). >> it was made out of material. >> (speaking s
represent us and his death. his name was pray, a lovely name which i feel embodies the current status of the equal rights. i doubt the city commission realizes how betrayed assam franciscans feel by the name of anti pelosi. how about someone who died in a secret prison. she knew about the secret prisons and covered up. as far as aids go, its sources in question. nancy pelosi did support the repeal of don't ask, don't tell, on the same day as obama brought this up, i believe it was cheney, enter poll received an arrest warrant on him and that did not make the front cover. thank you. >> we get the general thrust of your comments and we appreciate them. >> [reading names] >> it good morning, commissioners. thank you very much for giving us the opportunity to speak on this issue and thank you for your work. having been a commissioner, i know what you do, so thank you. i am the director of the mission language and vocational school. i have served for many years as president and on the school board. commissioner, i am before you to ask you to support and take the resolution and waive the wa
that it is. >> authorities are using the suspect's fingerprints, dnaa and a fake michigan driver's license to identify him. >>> the turmoil unfolding overseas is a topic on the presidential campaign trail. speaking in florida, president obama called the attack in bulgaria ruthless. mitt romney says the president isn't doing enough to end the crisis in syria. tara mergener has more from washington. a suicide bombing in bulgaria and the civil war in syria are drawing the attention of the presidential candidates. >> this is a moment of great uncertainty in the middle east given what's happening in syria and what's happening in other places. >> president barack obama deviated from his stump speech thursday in florida to condemn the suicide attack on a bus full of israeli tourists. >> now is the time to make sure that we are doing everything we can to protect israel's security. >> mitt romney says the u.s. should be doing more to stop the bloodshed in syria. president obama has add di indicated leadership and subcontracted policy to kofi annan and the united nations. >> aside from foreign polic
sent us this picture of the flooding in the hospital's parking garage. you can see just how serious it got. 3 let's go to meteorologist emily gracey for a breakdown... breakdown... of exactly what's happening with these storms tonight. 3 first on fox, someone slams into a new baltimore county speed camera lifting it's entire foundation out of the ground. ground. janice park joins us now to show us the damage. damage.hi jeff,police say what happened in pikesville was áno accident.instead, they say someone jumped a curb...then used thier car to rip this speed camera out of concrete. it happened tuesday n smith avenue.police are still looking for the person who used thier car as a weapon...to disable a county speed camera that had only been up for about a week.this latest attack...follows several other violeet speed camera attacks over the past year.a fox 5 viewer snapped a picture of a burning speed camera in downtown baltimore. and in linthicum an armed man emerged from the woods...startling a speed camera truck worker with shotgun and sledgehammer: 3 "totally out of the gro
information that could be used as evidence? and we're left with the lingering question and there's no good answer to this yet and that is why did he do that? the new york police commissioner ray kelly had reported that he had his hair painted red and said he was the joker and since then, there has been verification of that, that james holmes, the 24-year-old suspect, did indeed tell police he was the joker, but why is the outstanding question, ron. >> we've got 12 people dead, 71 reported wounded. is there any word as far as the wounded, how many of those 71 might be critically wounded? >> i just talked to some people who were at the hospital, the major hospital where the victims had been brought and they say they're being very closed mouthed. you can understand why and that is because a lot of the family members are trying to be contacted and so, we really don't know. we do know that some people have already been discharged, including a baby who was less than a year old who was inside the theatre, but as far as how many maybe seriously, maybe have life threatening injury, i haven't seen t
. the national search for understanding gives us something to do and some desperate order for us to claim. as a friend at fox put it something to occupy our mind, our minds racing with thoughts who made it out the those who did not. those still in the hospital. and the funerals to come, the greening to endure. and, then, the new day, later this summer, but i guess we move on. until then it is a mad media rush which i am a part, truth be told, trying to make desperate sense of scenes played and replayed that doctors will abide their patients not to watch and i cannot blame them. it could set off depression or copycats or a disturbing sense of horrible real drama. the worse kind of reality show. but reality, however. the he is not about red or blue. and god knows i am not a psychologist or psychiatrist. but whoever you look to for guidance, say a prayer. and ask for the wisdom not so much to understand this but how, together, we can find our way to a better day. i don't know what else to say. back to what the heck happened this day. to set up this craziness. to adam with the latest in color
meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to fight a coalition of people who suspect, among other things, that smart meters may be bad for your health. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: once again today, americans absorbed the news of a mass shooting-- a dozen dead, at least 59 hurt or wounded. it happened in the city of aurora, just east of denver, where a movie theater erupted in late-night chaos. newshour co
an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to see the mother rise. it is an important way for all of us to be able to connect with our families and with our communities. for americans living with disabilities, many of whom are also aging americans, broadband and commuters -- computers can provide even more critical tools for health and wellness. they allow someone with a speech impairment to e-mail her doctor, a person who is mobility limited to its in glasses -- classes online, and for someone else to work at home. 29% of people with disabilities would join the work force if telecommuting were actually a viable option for them. before working at home, however, broadband is now a necessity for anyone searching for a job. many job openings are only posted online. about 80% of fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. and about 60% of working americans use the internet as an integral part of their jobs every single day. if you do not have broadband, you are increasingly cut off from these opportunities.
. >> i'd like us to pause for a moment of silence for the victims of this terrible tragedy. >>> good evening, i'm ron reagan in seattle filling in for chris matthews. leading off tonight, tragedy in colorado. it happens all too often and the names have become to familiar. jones borrow, arkansas, virginia tech, columbine and now, aurora, colorado. it happened not far from columbine, where a sold out crowd gaterred in theatre nine for the premier of "the dark knight rises." police say a 24-year-old man walked through an exit door dressed in black, a black helmet, a bulletproof vest, throat protector, groin protector and black gloves. police say he was also carrying three weapons. a rifle, shotgun and a handgun. witnesses say holmes calmly set off some kind of device and began firing randomly and terrified moviegoers. people desperately tried to flee, in some cases, helping victims get out. in other cases, simply running for their lives. police say 71 were shot and 12 were killed. james holmes was arrested without a struggle in his car outside the theatre. police say holmes warned he ri
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